What does a bearberry look like?

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What does a bearberry look like?

Bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) is a low-growing ground cover that usually tops out between 6 and 12 inches (15-30 cm.). The flexible stems sport teardrop-shaped, leathery leaves in dark green. You'll find a small amount of white or pale pink waxy flowers between March and June.

Where is bearberry found?

Bearberry, (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi), also called kinnikinnick, flowering prostrate evergreen shrubs of the heath family (Ericaceae), occurring widely throughout the northern reaches of Europe, Asia, and North America in rocky and sandy woods and in open areas.

What is bearberry extract?

Bearberry extract is made from the leaves of the bearberry plant. It is commonly used as an astringent in cosmetic preparations and skin care products. It is also used as a lightening agent to fade freckles or skin discoloration which may be caused by sun damage or hormonal conditions.

How do you propagate kinnikinnick?

The surest means of propagation is by treated cuttings rooted in sand or layering. Seed Collection: The outer fleshy part of the fruit may be removed by macerating the fruits with water and separating the nutlets by flotation or air-screening. Seed Treatment: Remove seed from pulp. Plant outside in fall, 3/4" deep.

Where is a tundra located?

The tundra is a treeless polar desert found in the high latitudes in the polar regions, primarily in Alaska, Canada, Russia, Greenland, Iceland, and Scandinavia, as well as sub-Antarctic islands.

What are tundra climates?

Tundra ecosystems are treeless regions found in the Arctic and on the tops of mountains, where the climate is cold and windy, and rainfall is scant. Tundra lands are covered with snow for much of the year, but summer brings bursts of wildflowers.

What animals live in tundra?

Animals found in the Arctic tundra include herbivorous mammals (lemmings, voles, caribou, arctic hares, and squirrels), carnivorous mammals (arctic foxes, wolves, and polar bears), fish (cod, flatfish, salmon, and trout), insects (mosquitoes, flies, moths, grasshoppers, and blackflies), and birds (ravens, snow buntings ...